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15 - 17 July 2021

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International Conference on Chronobiology 2021
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International Conference on Chronobiology 2021

Chronobiology examines biological rhythms across time scales, notably daily and seasonal rhythms. The conference is an ideal platform for students, post-docs and faculty to discuss with internationally acclaimed researchers in the context of human health, evolutionary and ecological significance, underlying neuronal circuits, molecular mechanisms or mathematical models.

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30

Invited Speakers

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11

Sessions

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2

Poster Sessions to present and discuss your reseaarch

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Timeline

June 2021

Application Opens

15 June 2021 Online registration form

Applications are now open for submission!

Open application

Deadline for applications

21 June 2021 Online Submissions

Screening of submitted abstracts and selection of participants begins

Announcement of selected candidates

25 June 2021

Participants selected for poster presentations and talks will be informed.

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July 2021

Deadline for uploading poster

6 July 2021

Selected participants are to upload posters and an optional audio/video explanation of the same. Titles to be fixed and announced for the trainee talks

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Posters available for viewing

12 July 2021

Posters available for viewing

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Molecular clocks I – nuts & bolts of timekeeping devices

Chair : Joanna C Chiu & Sheeba Vasu

Schedule IST (+5.5 hrs GMT) : 09:00 - 11:00 AM

Break : 11:00 - 11:15 AM

Schedule Session Speaker
09:00 - 09.15 AM Inauguration

Opening remarks - Chairs and Executive Director IUSSTF

09.15 - 10.00 AM Keynote lecture Katja Lamia

Cryptochromes are promiscuous circadian transcriptional repressors

Abstract : Circadian disruption increases the risk of several pathological conditions, including metabolic disease and cancer. In the Lamia lab at Scripps Research, we are focused on trying to understand molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena. In particular, we are focused on investigating the role of the circadian repressors CRY1 and CRY2 in cell biological processes related to metabolism and tumorigenesis. Over the past decade, we have found that in addition to repressing the core clock activating complex, CRY1 and CRY2 suppress the activity of several additional transcription factors. The networks regulated by cryptochromes include several with well-established roles in metabolism and cell growth. For example, CRY1 and CRY2 repress several members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily that sense and respond to metabolic signals (e.g. hormones, vitamins, and dietary lipids). We also identified an unexpected molecular mechanism by which CRY2 stimulates protein ubiquitylation and turnover of c-MYC, which is among the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. In this lecture, I will discuss our investigation of CRY-dependent regulation of several different transcription factors by diverse mechanisms, including new data indicating that CRY protein regulate the critical tumor suppressor P53.

Katja Lamia
Katja Lamia Associate Professor at the Department of Molecular Medicine, Scripps Research, in La Jolla, California
10:00 - 10.30 AM Keynote lecture Patrick Emery

Parhyale hawaiensis: a genetically-tractable model organism to study circatidal rhythms

Abstract : The intertidal zone is defined as the area of the coastline located between the highest and lowest tides. It can thus be submerged or exposed to the air, and this makes the intertidal zone one the most challenging environment on Earth for organisms to live in. It is well known that intertidal organisms adapt their behavior and physiology to the 12.4-h tidal cycle with the use of endogenous clocks. However, these circatidal clocks are not well understood mechanistically, in large part because a genetically-tractable model organism with circatidal rhythms has so far not been available. Parhyale hawaiensis is an intertidal crustacean fully amenable to transgenesis and genome editing. Interestingly, we found that this amphipod exhibits robust 12.4-h behavioral rhythms that can be entrained to artificial tides and are temperature-compensated. Parhyale is therefore a very promising model organism for the study of circatidal rhythms. We are now characterizing their entrainment properties and using the genetic tools at our disposal to elucidate their molecular mechanisms.

Patrick Emery
Patrick Emery Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Neurobiology, Worcester MA
10.30 - 11.00 AM Short talk Sandipan Ray

Deciphering the mechanisms of action of pharmacological modulators of circadian clocks using multiplexed quantitative proteomics

Abstract : Pharmacological modulation of the circadian machinery could be an effective therapeutic strategy for combating a range of human diseases associated with circadian misalignments, such as mood and mental disorders, cancers, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. We systematically investigate the cellular effects and molecular targets of drugs/drug-like compounds that can enhance the circadian clock or alter the circadian period length or phase using multiplexed tandem mass tag-based quantitative mass spectrometry. An approach integrating multipronged quantitative proteomics approaches (global proteome, phosphoproteome, kinome profiling, and proteome-wide profiling of thermal stability) are applied to decipher the molecular mechanisms of the circadian clock-modulating compounds in human osteosarcoma U2OS cell line, a robust and well-characterized mammalian circadian model system. We have demonstrated changes in phosphorylation levels and activity of several proteins and kinases involved in vital signaling pathways including MAPK, BCR, AMPK, and mTOR signaling by the circadian clock modulating compounds. Since the effectiveness of drugs with shorter half-lives is reliably influenced by their dosing time, we are also investigating the impact of dosing time on the efficacy of these compounds. In sum, to develop highly effective and less toxic new drug molecules, we need a detailed mechanistic understanding of how circadian clock modulators specifically generate their therapeutic benefits to target those aspects of cell functions and physiological processes accurately. To this end, this translational project can address a critical knowledge gap at the interface of basic research and clinical application.

Sandipan Ray
Sandipan Ray Assistant Professor, Department of Biotechnology, IIT Hyderabad

Molecular Clocks II

Chair : Anand T Vaidya

Schedule IST (+5.5 hrs GMT) : 09:00 AM- 11:00 AM

Break : 11:00 - 11:15 AM

Schedule Session Speaker
09:15 - 10:00 AM Keynote lecture Joanna Chiu

Non-transcriptional regulation of circadian physiology

Abstract : The integration of circadian and metabolic signals is essential for maintaining robust circadian rhythms and ensuring efficient metabolism and energy use. Using Drosophila as an animal model, we showed that cellular protein O-GlcNAcylation exhibits robust 24-hour rhythm and represents a key post-translational mechanism that regulates circadian physiology. We observed strong correlation between protein O-GlcNAcylation rhythms and clock-controlled feeding-fasting cycles, suggesting that O-GlcNAcylation rhythms are primarily driven by nutrient input. Interestingly, daily O-GlcNAcylation rhythms were severely dampened when we subjected flies to time-restricted feeding at unnatural feeding time. This suggests the presence of clock-regulated buffering mechanisms that prevent excessive O-GlcNAcylation at non-optimal times of the day-night cycle. We show that this buffering mechanism is mediated by the expression and activity of GFAT, OGT, and OGA, which are regulated through integration of circadian and metabolic signals. Finally, we generated a mathematical model to describe the key factors that regulate daily protein O-GlcNAcylation rhythm.

Joanna Chiu
Joanna Chiu Associate Professor, Department of Entomology and Nematology, UC Davis
10:00 - 10:30 AM Short talk Sougata Roy

Dinoflagellate clock - Is it a unique circadian model?

Abstract : The eukaryotic clock that orchestrates the daily rhythms in behaviour, physiology and metabolism is organized as transcription-translation feedback loop (TTFL). Although the genes constituting the clock differ across eukaryotic lineages, the TTFL mechanism remains as the conserved backbone of the clock. At the molecular level, different cellular times are defined by combinations of the amounts of clock gene mRNA and protein. Transcriptional regulation has always been considered as the primary driving force behind the generation of the overt rhythms. However, the recent advances showed that post transcriptional and metabolic factors are equally important. The unicellular photosynthetic dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedra (previously Gonyaulax polyedra) circadian system does not require rhythmic RNAs to sustain daily rhythms. To determine cellular time L. polyedra uses a mechanism that is distinct from the conserved eukaryotic TTFL. The L. polyedra clock is driven by a yet unknown post-transcriptional oscillator. For the past 60 years L. polyedra has been principally studied as a model to understand the biochemical details of the many physiological rhythms whose timing is controlled by the circadian clock. With the advancement of the ? ?Omics? technology this unconventional algal circadian model has much to offer.

Sougata Roy
Sougata Roy Assistant Professor of Biology, Ashoka University
10:30 - 10:45 AM Trainee talk 6 Akanksha Sharma

Molecular drivers of spring migratory phenotype in captive migratory redheaded buntings

Abstract : Using gene and protein expression approaches, we investigated molecular drivers of the development of spring migration in Palearctic ? Indian obligate migratory redheaded buntings. The birds held in captivity under short days were photostimulated by exposing them to long-days for 4 days (early stimulated, LD-eS) or for ?3 weeks until each bird had shown 4 successive nights of Zugunruhe (stimulated, LD-S); controls were maintained under short days. In birds exposed for ~ 3 weeks to long days, the photostimulated indices of the migratory preparedness (body fattening and weight gain, and Zugunruhe) were paralleled with upregulated expression of genes associated with the fatty acid synthesis (acc, dgat2) and transport (apoa1, cd36, fabp3 and cpt1) in the liver and flight muscle. Along with this, the expression of genes involved in the calcium ion signalling and transport (camk1 and atp2a2; camk2a in LD-eS), cellular oxidative stress (hspa8 and sod1) and metabolic pathways (apoa1 and sirt1) were upregulated found in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). Further, MBH-specific quantitative proteomics revealed that out of 503 annotated proteins, 28 were differentially expressed (LD-eS versus LD-S: 21 up-regulated and 7 down-regulated) and they enriched five physiological pathways that are associated with FA transport and metabolism. These results demonstrate comprehensive changes in hypothalamic gene and protein expressions in response to increasing spring photoperiods that may aid obligate songbird migrants in their decision when to migrate from wintering areas.

Akanksha Sharma
Akanksha Sharma Delhi University, Delhi
10:45 - 11:00 AM Trainee talk 7 Arijit Ghosh

A tale of two chronotypes: insights from a population genomic study in Drosophila melanogaster

Abstract : Heritable variation in the timing of rhythmic events with respect to daily time cues gives rise to chronotypes. Chronotypes have attracted considerable attention in the recent past with various studies reporting the association of chronotype differences with a myriad of psychological, metabolic and other physiological dysregulations, thus highlighting the importance of understanding the functional underpinnings of chronotype regulation. Exploring mechanisms driving differential phases-of-entrainment can help us better understand chronotype regulation. To this end, we adopted a laboratory based artificial selection approach to derive 4 independent replicate populations of Drosophila melanogastereach exhibiting morning (early) and evening (late) adult emergence chronotypes. Over the course of ~19 years (>340 generations) we have reported that all four replicate populations of early and late emergence chronotypes are associated with differences in various circadian clock properties. Having established a well-characterized model of chronotypes that have evolved over real-time, presumably preserving naturally occurring genetic correlations, that can serve as a system for further molecular-genetic studies, we sequenced the genomes of our early and late populations. We did this with the aim of identifying putative loci that are likely to be associated with entrained phase/chronotype differences. Our population genomic and selective sweep analyses enabled us to identify plausible causal loci under selection differentially in early and late flies with respect to the control populations. We identify novel SNPs under selection in both clock and non-clock genes in all populations and note several genes and pathways associated differentially with early and latepopulations, e.g., several clock genes are under differential selection between the populations. Moreover, earlypopulations are associated with polymorphisms in pathways of regulation of circadian behavior, immunity, phototransduction and photo response; while late populations are associated with ecdysis, sterol metabolism, splicing mechanisms and metabolic pathways.

Arijit Ghosh
Arijit Ghosh JNCASR

Clocks & Sleep

Chair : Babita Pande

Schedule IST (+5.5 hrs GMT) : 09:00 AM- 11:00 AM

Break : 11:00 - 11:15 AM

Schedule Session Speaker
09:15 - 10:00 AM Keynote lecture Horacio de la Iglesia

How the moon keeps us awake

Abstract : Throughout evolution and history, humans have progressively isolated themselves from natural cycles through built environments that isolate them from the external environment. Key to this isolation is our ability to manipulate artificial light and extend our activity into the nighttime. Recent studies from our laboratory suggest that moonlight not only had a similar effect on activity in ancestral times but also that the phases of the moon continue to shape our daily sleep in highly urbanized communities.

Horacio de la Iglesia
Horacio de la Iglesia Professor, Department of Biology, University of Washington
10:00 - 10:30 AM Short talk Krishna Melnattur

Sleep is plastic, and supports plasticity

Abstract : Sleep is near universal in animals and recognized to be plastic and influenced by ecological factors and environmental changes. Changes in sleep in turn are thought to facilitate neural plasticity and consequently, behaviour. The mechanisms that might regulate sleep-plasticity, and the mechanisms by which sleep might support adaptive behaviour are however, not well understood. Our recent work speaks to both of these aspects. First, we found that manipulations that impair flight in Drosophila increase sleep as a form of sleep-plasticity. Further, we identified a novel neural circuit that mediates this effect. This circuit consists of pheromone-sensitive sensory neurons, their partner projection neurons, and targets of the projection neurons in the brain. Second, we have adapted a spatial learning assay to explore the relationship between sleep and plasticity. Excitingly we find that flies exhibit age dependent declines in spatial learning that are reversed by enhancing sleep. These data reveal an unexpected role for flight in regulating sleep, provide new insight into how sensory processing controls sleep need, and how sleep impacts adaptive behaviour

Krishna Melnattur
Krishna Melnattur Staff Scientist, Dept. Neuroscience, WU, Soon to be Assistant Proffessor at Ashoka University
10:30 - 10:45 PM Trainee talk 10 Geetanjali Thakur

Sleep-wake behavior in young aged rural and urban inhabitants before and during COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional study from southeast India

Geetanjali Thakur
Geetanjali Thakur Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur
10:45 - 11:00 PM Trainee talk 11 Neelu Jain Gupta

Working against circadian clock- Shift Workers alters daily eating-fasting and activity-sleep patterns

Abstract : Night shift work is an occupational arrangement that involves working against the daily clock. Besides light at night, a social jetlag, late-night eating, breakfast-skipping, and irregular sleep routines lead to cognitive loss and poor health in industrial shift workers. We collected daily nutritional and sleep data of 30 male industrial shift workers living in Meerut region for 3.5 months each. Food and beverage intake were longitudinally logged by volunteers using their cellphones and recorded in app-backend- MyCircadianClock (Panda and Gill, 2015). Baseline data collected for initial two weeks revealed significant differences in time of first and last meal, depending on shift onset. App data analysis also suggested unhealthy sleep patterns and less sleep satisfaction. Ambulatory blood-pressure (BP) and activity recorded using ABPM and Phillips Actiwatches, suggested dampened amplitude of daily BP rhythm and less activity during night shifts.

Neelu Jain Gupta
Neelu Jain Gupta Chaudhary Charan Singh University, Meerut

Molecular clocks I – nuts & bolts of timekeeping devices

Session 1

Katja Lamia

Katja Lamia

Associate Professor at the Department of Molecular Medicine, Scripps Research, in La Jolla, California

Cryptochromes are promiscuous circadian transcriptional repressors

09.15 - 10.00 AM

Patrick Emery

Patrick Emery

Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Neurobiology, Worcester MA

Parhyale hawaiensis: a genetically-tractable model organism to study circatidal rhythms

10:00 - 10.30 AM

Sandipan Ray

Sandipan Ray

Assistant Professor, Department of Biotechnology, IIT Hyderabad

Deciphering the mechanisms of action of pharmacological modulators of circadian clocks using multiplexed quantitative proteomics

10.30 - 11.00 AM

Human Rhythms – Clock impact on Health & Well-being

Session 2

Shantha Rajaratnam

Shantha Rajaratnam

Professor, Turner Institute, Monash University

Shedding new light on Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder

11:15 AM - 12:00 PM

Subhashis Sahu

Subhashis Sahu

Professor, Department of Physiology, University of Kalyani

Wellbeing during lockdown and new normal life style: Ergonomic perspectives

12:00 - 12:30 PM

Amit Trivedi

Amit Trivedi

Assistant Professor, Department of Zoology, Mizoram University

Sleep quality among school students

12:30 - 01:00 PM

Clocks of Every Hue – Molecules to Behaviours

Session 3

Surbhi Sharma

Surbhi Sharma

CSIR-IGIB, Delhi

Elucidating the role of a novel circadian transcript in retina.

04:00 - 04:15 PM

Megha Das

Megha Das

Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi

Does blue wavelength of light at night alter diel pattern of reproductive clocks and hamper female reproductive outcomes in the golden hamster?

04:15 - 04:30 PM

Perumal Subramanian

Perumal Subramanian

Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Annamalai University

Twenty-four hour proteome profile in Drosophila melanogaster under oxidative stress: protective influences of hesperidin

04:30 - 05:00 PM

Axel Brockmann

Axel Brockmann

Faculty, National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS-TIFR)

Honey bee foraging and time-space memory

05:00 - 05:30 PM

Sraddha Pradhan

Sraddha Pradhan

Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur

Characteristics of behavioral sleep variables in elite female basketball players

05:30 - 05:45 PM

Sunil Birua

Sunil Birua

SASTRA University, Tanjavur

Fine tuning of circadian clock properties under the interaction of diet restriction and speed of development

05:45 - 06:00 PM

Priyam Narain

Priyam Narain

New York University, Abu Dhabi

Mechanisms underlying rhythmic excitability in mammalian clock neurons

06:00 - 06:15 PM

Celebrating 50 years of the SCN

Session 4

Erik D Herzog & William J Schwartz

Erik D Herzog & William J Schwartz

Professor, Washington University in St. Louis & Professor, Department of Neurology The University of Texas at Austin

Fifty Years of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus: Transforming a Cartoon into a Living Clock

06:30 - 08:00 PM

Molecular Clocks II

Session 5

Joanna Chiu

Joanna Chiu

Associate Professor, Department of Entomology and Nematology, UC Davis

Non-transcriptional regulation of circadian physiology

09:15 - 10:00 AM

Sougata Roy

Sougata Roy

Assistant Professor of Biology, Ashoka University

Dinoflagellate clock - Is it a unique circadian model?

10:00 - 10:30 AM

Akanksha Sharma

Akanksha Sharma

Delhi University, Delhi

Molecular drivers of spring migratory phenotype in captive migratory redheaded buntings

10:30 - 10:45 AM

Arijit Ghosh

Arijit Ghosh

JNCASR

A tale of two chronotypes: insights from a population genomic study in Drosophila melanogaster

10:45 - 11:00 AM

Computational & Theoretical Studies on Clocks & Rhythms

Session 6

Albert Goldbeter

Albert Goldbeter

Professor, Unit? de Chronobiologie Th?orique, Universit? Libre de Bruxelles

Historical overview of modelling rhythms and clocks

11:15 - 11:30 AM

Sandeep Krishna

Sandeep Krishna

Faculty, National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS-TIFR)

Entrainment and phase-locking of ultradian oscillations in cells

11:30 AM -12:00 PM

Sriram K

Sriram K

Associate Professor (CB), Indraprastha Institute of Information Technology, Delhi

Mathematical modeling of time-of-day effects on learning and memory.

12:00 - 12:30 PM

Shaon Chakrabarti

Shaon Chakrabarti

Faculty, National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS-TIFR)

Why cousins are more similar than mother-daughters: inferring circadian control over the cell cycle

12:30 - 01:00 PM

Clocks & Metabolism

Session 7

Vaishnavi Dandavate

Vaishnavi Dandavate

Weizmann Institute of Science, Tel Aviv

Clock proteins and training modify exercise capacity in a day-time dependent manner

04:00 - 04:15 PM

PL Manasa

PL Manasa

Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur

Rest-activity rhythm, energy expenditure and meal pattern in female university students as a function of body mass index

04:15 - 04:30 PM

Nisha Kannan

Nisha Kannan

Assistant Professor, IISER Thiruvananthapuram

Chronic caffeine treatment disrupts the circadian rhythm in Drosophila.

04:30 - 05:00 PM

Ullas Kolthur

Ullas Kolthur

Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai

Metabolic choreography of molecular mechanisms that dictate feed-fast transitions and govern physiological plasticity

05:00 - 05:30 PM

Amita Sehgal

Amita Sehgal

John Herr Musser Professor of Neuroscience, Perelman school of medicine, UPenn

Interactions Between Sleep:Wake Cycles and Metabolism

05:30 - 06:15 PM

Molecular Clocks III

Session 8

Brian Zoltowski

Brian Zoltowski

Associate Professor, Southern Methodist University, Department of Chemistry, USA

Chemical Integration of Circadian and Photoperiodic Clocks in Plants

06:30 - 07:00 PM

Ashutosh Srivastava

Ashutosh Srivastava

Assistant Professor, Biological Engineering, IIT Gandhinagar

Structural and dynamical insights into mammalian cryptochromes

07:00 - 07:30 PM

Anita Jagota

Anita Jagota

Professor, School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad

Circadian dysfunction with aging and neurodegeneration

07:30 - 08:00 PM

Clocks & Sleep

Session 9

Horacio de la Iglesia

Horacio de la Iglesia

Professor, Department of Biology, University of Washington

How the moon keeps us awake

09:15 - 10:00 AM

Krishna Melnattur

Krishna Melnattur

Staff Scientist, Dept. Neuroscience, WU, Soon to be Assistant Proffessor at Ashoka University

Sleep is plastic, and supports plasticity

10:00 - 10:30 AM

Geetanjali Thakur

Geetanjali Thakur

Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur

Sleep-wake behavior in young aged rural and urban inhabitants before and during COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional study from southeast India

10:30 - 10:45 PM

Neelu Jain Gupta

Neelu Jain Gupta

Chaudhary Charan Singh University, Meerut

Working against circadian clock- Shift Workers alters daily eating-fasting and activity-sleep patterns

10:45 - 11:00 PM

Ecological Aspects of Clocks & Rhythms

Session 10

Marcel Visser

Marcel Visser

Professor, Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW)

The ecology and evolution of seasonal timing

11:15 - 12:00 PM

Muniyandi Singaravel

Muniyandi Singaravel

Professor, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University

Social synchronization of the circadian clock in mice

12:00 - 12:30 AM

Chitrang Dani

Chitrang Dani

JNCASR

What can we learn about the circadian clock from flies evolving under semi-natural conditions?

12:30 - 12:45 PM

Vidya Shukla

Vidya Shukla

Mangalore University, Mangalore

Neuronal activity in brain of Red headed bunting (Emberiza bruniceps) during early and late phases of Zugunruhe

12:45 - 01:00 PM

Session 11

Tyler Stevenson

Tyler Stevenson

Associate Professor, Institute of BAH & CM, University of Glasgow

Molecular architecture of seasonality in birds

02:00 - 02:45 PM

Anand Dixit

Anand Dixit

Professor, Zoology Department, North-Eastern Hill University

Photoperiodic regulation of reproductive seasonality in the tree sparrow

02:45 - 03:15 PM

Vinod Kumar

Vinod Kumar

Professor, Department of Zoology, Delhi University

Timing shapes survival: Circadian Clocks and Seasonal Adaptation in Obligate Avian Migrants

03:15 - 03:45 PM

Barbara Helm

Barbara Helm

Associate Professor at Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences, University of Groningen

Getting the timing right in complex environments: bird migration

03:45 - 04:30 PM

InSC Meeting & Prize Announcements

Session 12

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